Migration & Trafficking

Global Monitoring of CEDAW Concluding Observations Relating to Sex Work

NSWP has developed a global monitoring system to track and analyse the concluding observations relevant to sex work that are published by the Committee for the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) three times a year for those countries that have ratified the CEDAW Convention. The purpose of the monitoring is to track which types of recommendations that CEDAW makes for different countries to improve the status of women and what this shows about CEDAW’s awareness and inclusion of sex workers’ rights. 

Briefing Paper: Migration and Sex Work

Despite the global trend of increasing mobility, migrant workers are still stigmatised and silenced – in politics and media alike. Additionally, migrant sex workers are painted as either victims or criminals in discourses that conflate sex work with human trafficking and deny sex workers the right to migrate. Their human rights are often ignored in favour of driving broader political agendas to restrict migration and criminalise sex work.

Community Guide: Migration and Sex Work

Despite the global trend of increasing mobility, migrant workers are still stigmatised and silenced – in politics and media alike. Additionally, migrant sex workers are painted as either victims or criminals in discourses that conflate sex work with human trafficking and deny sex workers the right to migrate. Their human rights are often ignored in favour of driving broader political agendas to restrict migration and criminalise sex work. 

Briefing Paper: The Consequences of Misinformation about Sex Work and Sex Workers

Misinformation about sex work and sex workers has long served as a tool for politicians, religious leaders, fundamental feminists and abolitionist groups, and anti-trafficking organisations to advance anti-sex work agendas. The conflation of sex work with trafficking and exploitation is at the root of misinformation on sex work. ‘End Demand’ models that criminalise sex workers’ clients, ‘raid and rescue’ operations, and ‘exit’ and ‘rehabilitation’ services further deny the diverse lived experiences of sex workers while obscuring true victims of trafficking.

Case Study: Sex Worker-led Organisations’ Engagement with the Women’s Movement

The struggles for sex workers’ and women’s rights are innately interconnected. Worldwide, most sex workers are women, who share challenges in their fight for justice, equality, and the right to be free from violence, stigma, and discrimination. Nevertheless, within the women’s movement there have been obstacles to acceptance of and meaningful engagement with sex worker-led organisations, ranging from ideological opposition to outright abuse.

NSWP Statement on the High Level Meeting on Trafficking of Persons: Conflation of Sex Work and Trafficking

NSWP have published this written statement in response to the High Level Meeting on Trafficking in Persons. You can read the statement below or download it above. The Count Me In! Consortium have also published a video which you can watch below.

Briefing Note: ‘Sexual Exploitation’ in the Global Fund’s Codes of Conduct

The Global Fund has established Codes of Conduct which employees, resource recipients, suppliers, Country Coordinating Mechanism (CCM) members, and governance officials must uphold while carrying out their work. One of the requirements, which applies to all parties under these codes, is to prohibit ‘sexual exploitation.’ Due to widespread conflations of sex work with ‘sexual exploitation,’ however, there is concern that this provision may be misinterpreted to exclude sex workers.

Illustrated Consensus Statement on Sex Work, Human Rights, and the Law

This is a summary of NSWP's Consensus Statement on Sex Work, Human Rights, and the Law. The Consensus Statement is issued on behalf of NSWP members and the sex workers they represent including sex workers of all genders, class, race, ethnicity, health status, age, nationality, citizenship, language, education levels, disabilities, and many other factors.