Resources

The 2023-2028 Global Fund Strategy will guide Global Fund approaches, decision-making, and investment for the next 6 years in a 70-page document. It is important because it describes what the Global Fund will do and how it will do it. The Strategy will influence how investment will be disbursed at the country level, how and who will implement programmes, and how and who will be involved in making the decisions.

Theme: Health

To mark World AIDS Day 2019, UNAIDS has published two resources: ‘Communities make the difference’, and ‘What is a community-led organization?’.

Theme: Health

Between 23rd and 27th July 2018, more than 120 sex workers from more than 25 countries attended the 22nd International AIDS Conference (AIDS2018) in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The bi-annual International AIDS Conferences are the largest global gathering of HIV academics, implementers, policy makers, people living with HIV and those most affected by HIV, including sex workers.

This Smart Guide is a quick reference for sex workers and people who use drugs to help understand the transition from Global Fund financing. ‘Transition’ is the process that happens when Global Fund financing for programmes (for HIV, TB and/or Malaria) comes to an end and the country takes full responsibility for funding and implementing programmes without any external Global Fund support.

Theme: Health

The Smart Sex Workers’ Guide to the Global Fund Strategy 2017-2022: “Investing to End Epidemics” is a resource for sex workers to better understand the purpose and the goals of the Global Fund. This Guide describes the key points of the Global Fund Strategy, looks at what they mean for sex workers, and explores the opportunities for sex work organisations to use the strategy to strengthen sex workers’ capacity to engage in Global Fund processes and influence sex worker programmes funded through the Global Fund.

Theme: Health

The Smart Service Provider’s Guide to ICT and Sex Work is a resource for service providers who want to better understand how Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) have impacted sex workers and the prevention of HIV. This guide identifies good and bad practice for development and implementing ICT outreach services, based on consultation with sex workers and NSWP member organisations.

Theme: Health

Open Society Foundation have published No Turning Back: Examining Sex Worker-Led Programs that Protect Health and Rights. Stigma, criminal laws, and punitive policing practices harm sex workers, including their health. In response, a growing number of authorities across the world have called for the decriminalisation of sex work. The six case studies in this publication—in Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Ukraine, South Africa, and Zimbabwe—offer a look at sex worker–led programming that has reduced police abuse, health risks, and other adverse impacts of bad laws and law enforcement on sex workers.

Download this resource: No Turning Back, OSF - 2016
Theme: Health

Asia Catalyst has published their report First Do No Harm: Discrimination in Health Care Settings against People Living with HIV in Cambodia, China, Myanmar, and Viet Nam. This research is based on 202 interviews conducted by 8 community organisations including NSWP member Aye Myanmar Association (AMA). It documents the discriminatory practices faced by people living with HIV in health care settings, and also provides examples of what rights-based health care looks like. 

Theme: Health

The International Treatment Preparedness Coalition (ITPC) and AIDS & Rights Alliance for Southern Africa (ARASA) in collaboration with 11 organisation have sent this public letter entitled Exclusion of Key Populations and People Living with HIV from implementation of Programmes to The Global Fund and PEPFAR. They detail specific obstacles to running, participating in and monitoring programmes funded by these two major donors. They are gravely concerned by the exclusion and side-lining of key populations. 

Theme: Health

The Eastern Africa National Networks of AIDS Service Organisations (EANNASO) has published a Community Guide to the Global Fund's Key Population Action Plan 2014-2017. This guide provides an overview of who key populations are, why they are important, and what the Global Fund has planned for key populations from 2014 - 2017. The plan has five objectives to make sure key populations and their needs are included in every step of the grant cycle.

Theme: Health

This Statement on the Occasion of the if the UN General Assembly 2016 High-Level Meeting on Ending AIDS by the UNAIDS Reference Group on HIV & Human Rights contributes to the ongoing negotiations around the political declaration that will be adopted by the UN General Assembly on the 8-10 of June, 2016. The UNAIDS Reference Group on HIV and Human Rights offers a number of recommendations to Member States for the 2016 Political Declaration.

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Theme: Health

This resource outlines the targets, goals, vision and strategies of the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS). It recommends decriminalisation of sex work as part of an effective HIV response: "The decriminalization of sex work could prevent people from acquiring HIV through combined effects on violence, police harassment, safer work environments and HIV transmission pathways."

Prior to the 2010 International AIDS Conference, the Smart Person's Guide to HIV and Sex Work was released in order to clarify current policy and action items relating to HIV and the role of sex worker organisations in responding to this global epidemic.

Theme: Health

The Smart Sex Worker’s Guide to SWIT provides a short summary of the key points in Sex Worker Implemetation Tool (SWIT). The Sex Worker Implementation Tool (SWIT) offers practical guidance on effective HIV and STI programming for sex workers. It provides evidence for the necessity of decriminalisation of sex work, the involvement of sex workers in developing policy, and the empowerment and self-determination of sex work communities as a fundamental part of the fight against HIV. This resource is based on the WHO, UNFPA, UNAIDS and NSWP 2012 recommendations on HIV and Sex Work. The guide can be used by sex workers and sex worker organisations who are designing or running programmes for sex workers. It may also be useful as an advocacy tool when advocating for rights-based services.

The Smart Sex Worker's Guide to The Global Fund is aimed at sex workers as a quick reference guide to help sex workers understand the Global Fund and its complex structures. The guide is helpful to sex worker organisations who are already receiving funding from the Global Fund as well as to those who hope to receive funding from the Fund in the future.

Theme: Health

In April 2015, the Open Society Foundations organised a meeting of experts and advocates concerned about the future of The Global Fund, particularly in the areas of preserving support to important programs in middle-income countries and the role of The Global Fund in supporting access to medicines. The two papers, presented at the meeting, discuss and critique The Global Fund's funding strategies. The meeting report summarises the conclusions of the meeting.

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Theme: Health

Working Together is a guide to increase and improve the meaningful involvement of the community sector, including key population networks, local NGOs, ASOs, and networks of people living with HIV, in all aspects of national HIV responses, with an emphasis on national planning and decision-making processes.

Theme: Health

Explanation of Band 4 of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and its Implications for Civil Society and Key Populations

Theme: Health

The summary discussion looks at highlights and activities that have advanced The Commission’s recommendations. The report has been widely disseminated at the national level to key policy makers with a view to persuade decision makers to promote a favourable legal framework to respond to HIV. Concrete changes in legal framework changes (in relation to sex workers and other key populations) as recommended by The Commission are however, not reported.

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